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What type of American English do you speak?

At last one of those blog quizzes which actually seems to mean something (maybe): What Kind of American English Do You Speak?

Some of the questions reflect regional differences that I've read about elsewhere, so it looks legit to me. I scored 65% General American English, 30% Dixie and 5% Yankee, which sounds about right.

(Via Elenamary.)

language 2005.04.24 link

Comments

Just yesterday my girlfriend looked at me funny when I said carriage outside an HEB. Having lived all over the place, I can't explain why I've picked up so much Dixie in relation to Yankee. Guess my speech is still developing.

Your Linguistic Profile:
60% General American English
20% Yankee
15% Dixie
5% Upper Midwestern
0% Midwestern

Michael S. [info cxe schliefkevision punkto com] • 2005.04.25
emm, I don't think it is totally legit even though it is tons of fun. One of the things that made me question its validity was the soda/pop question. It really isn't too regional. http://www.popvssoda.com/

elenamary [elenamary cxe hotmail punkto com] • 2005.04.26
Amusing... I posted my wife vs. my own results and it seems to at least get the gist of our differences, though it's fuzzy at best... I think these tests could be far more accurate, but would lose a lot of potential test-takers by making them any longer that ultra-short.

michaelm [plantwater cxe gmail punkto com] • 2005.04.26
With each question worth 5%, it can't be very grainy. I agree with Michael that it captures the gist of things -- certainly more than the other quizzes on the same site gauging emotional age, life expectancy and (gag) brain gender.

The soda/pop/coke question isn't grainy enough: I learned "pop" growing up in small-town Ohio, then got ridiculed for this usage in Houston by a "soda water" proponent.

Gabriel Suerte [gabriel cxe suerte punkto com] • 2005.04.26
fyui

Anonymous • 2005.04.28
fyu

Anonymous • 2005.04.28
hola gays

Anonymous [kinomed2000 cxe yahoo punkto com] • 2005.04.28
I just saw this same thing recently, blogged about it too. They are missing a lot; it put me at 5% Upper Midwestern, and that's where I'm from. There's all kind of cool regionalisms they don't know about, like the way we shorten sentences and put a preposition at the end, or how we slam strings of words together into a kind of vowel grunt, but we all know what it means. (i.e. "look at that" becomes something like "oueaat".)

Have you seen the Dictionary of American Regional English?

Joley [wasteyourtimehere cxe yahoo punkto com] • 2005.05.11
I just saw this same thing recently, blogged about it too. They are missing a lot; it put me at 5% Upper Midwestern, and that's where I'm from. There's all kind of cool regionalisms they don't know about, like the way we shorten sentences and put a preposition at the end, or how we slam strings of words together into a kind of vowel grunt, but we all know what it means. (i.e. "look at that" becomes something like "oueaat".)

Have you seen the Dictionary of American Regional English?

Joley [wasteyourtimehere cxe yahoo punkto com] • 2005.05.11
Just wanted to say hi!

My scores:
Your Linguistic Profile:
65% General American English
10% Dixie
10% Midwestern
10% Upper Midwestern
5% Yankee

I picked up a "Yankee," like you! Oh, the horror! Wonder what my "Upper Midwestern's" where?

Larry Schultz [jemezfisher cxe yahoo punkto com] • 2005.05.31
Well, it didn't pick up that I don't speak American English at all. But there were a few answers where I couldn't choose any response accurately.

Jez [jez cxe jezblog punkto 34sp punkto com] • 2005.06.09
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